Thursday, October 16, 2008

SnTT: Add A "Universal Toolbar" To Your Lotus Notes Applications

Hey, look at that: A Show-n-Tell Thursday post. Woohoo! OK...I've got to think up a better/more descriptive name than "universal toolbar", but I'm creatively challenged today. At least I got a post out...geez. :-)

If you think about most of your applications, there are probably certain functions that are executed more than anything else. Perhaps it is a particular search mechanism, running a certain agent or navigating to a given document. Whatever the most common action is, do you make it easy for your users to get to? By easy, I mean is it always available or at least one step away? If not, you might want to consider using the universal toolbar technique. It's a simple and elegant solution for many UIs.

Here is one example. In this application, the most frequent activity is to open a particular document. There are several different parts and areas to this application, but often the user needs to quickly get to one of the core documents by the key value (in this case a part number). In a typical Notes application UI, a user would have to navigate to the view that contained the document in question, then use the "Starts with..." quick find function to jump to the document and then double-click on the document to open it. This is at least 3 steps and for a very frequently used activity, I think this is too much. Instead, my universal toolbar includes the ability for the user to enter the Part Number and open the document directly, no matter where in the application they are.




As you can see from the screenshots, it doesn't matter where the user is in the application, they always have the ability to enter the Part Number and the application will open the document. This saves the users tons of time and they love it!

To do this, I add a small frame into the application frameset. This can be positioned anywhere really, but I find it works well near the top or under the header. This frame becomes the container for your universal toolbar, which is usually a form containing the functionality you want to make available.


If you look carefully, you'll also notice I use a border caption on the universal toolbar frame so that it can be hidden if desired, freeing up that screen real estate.

Here's another example of using the universal toolbar concept in an application. In this case, I gave the users drop-down navigation. Space was at a premium in this application, so we wanted to remove any links to the left or right side of the screen.


One other way I've used this is to allow the user to quickly add new documents without opening a form.


So that's it...pretty simple but very effective. Everytime I've added this functionality to an existing application, I've received rave reviews from users and thanks for saving them time. Give it a try in your apps and let me know how it works.

5 comments:

Dietmar said...

Seems the Linde header frame was most at a premium - while being the most functionless... Sorry could not resist ;-)

Chris Blatnick said...

@Dietmar - haha...touché! :-)

Very true, but unfortunately this was our "standard". Really, though, it wasn't so bad, since we were most concerned about the real estate horizontally speaking.

quintessens said...

SnTT is also about telling, right? I was wondering how you achied the drop-down navigation above the view/content? Is that based upon actions in a view or...?

YeloCAB said...

Wow! What a great idea. (I feel kind of silly for not thinking of something this simple and useful myself.) I have added it to one of my major databases.

Pedro Q. said...

Those dropdown menus... are they layers with outlines?

Having a demo db with all this stuff would be so cool... :-D